End Credits - December 4, 2019 (Knives Out)

6Dec

This week on End Credits, we tuck in for Knives Out. There's been a lot of anticipation for this new mystery movie, and we certainly can't wait to tell you about it!  We'll also talk about the future of movie theatres in the U.S. and Canada, the deal with the Decade of the Fan, and whether we understand the career of a two-time Oscar-winning actor like we think we do.

This Wednesday, December 4, at 2 pm, Adam A. Donaldson and Peter Salmon will discuss:

Six Decrees of Separation. Several decades ago, the U.S. Justice Department decreed that no studio could own a movie theatre, but the 2019 department is looking to get rid of regulations that no longer seem applicable in the modern sense. So should we be worried about the further monopolization of the movie business, or is this further proof of the growing irrelevance of theatrical releases?

Hanks for the Memories. A /Film article dared to make the point that while Tom Hanks has enjoyed decades of popularity and exposure, he should be considered every bit a versatile actor in the same league as Daniel Day-Lewis. So have we overlooked Hanks' skill with the craft, and are we writing him off when we only think of him as America's dad?

Fandemonium. Film writer Drew McWeeny looked back at the decade and coined it "The Decade of the Fan," and he did not mean it as a compliment. While the story of the last 10 years has been the success of Marvel Studios, and other nerdy works, it's also introduced us to the idea of "toxic fandom" and a cutthroat internet film culture. Does McWeeny have a point?

Pretty Cool Junxion. Cineplex has announced the future of the movie theatre, and it's got video games, VR, live performance spaces and a food court. The first "Junxion" will open late next year at the Erin Mills Town Centre, but can't it be argued that with arcades, party rooms and pizza that Cineplex theatres are already halfway to their bright, shiny (and profitable) future?

REVIEW: Knives Out (2019). Rian Johnson's last film was the contentious epic Star Wars: The Last Jedi, but with Knives Out, Johnson gets back to basics. If you liked his earlier hits Brick or Brothers Bloom, you will dig this Agatha Christie-style whodunnit with an all-star cast lead by the goofy charm of Daniel Craig, and the earnest sweetness of Ana de Armas. Is there still room at the multiplex to enjoy the simple charms of a cheeky murder mystery?

End Credits is on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca Wednesday at 2 pm.

GUELPH POLITICAST #199 - The World Since December 6, 1989

4Dec

At Guelph-Wellington Women in Crisis, they deal with issues of violence against women all year round, but for everyone else, at least one day of year makes us all stop and think about femicide and gender-based violence. It's the anniversary of the worst mass shooting in Canadian history, and it was all directed at women because the perpetrator, in his own words, was "fighting feminism" when he killed 14 and injured 10 others at L'École Polytechnique on December 6, 1989.

Before listening to the podcast, take a minute to read the names and remember them: Geneviève Bergeron, Hélène Colgan, Nathalie Croteau, Barbara Daigneault, Anne-Marie Edward, Maud Haviernick, Maryse Laganière, Maryse Leclair, Anne-Marie Lemay, Sonia Pelletier, Michèle Richard, Annie St-Arneault, Annie Turcotte, and Barbara Klucznik-Widajewicz. Most of them were at school to become engineers, and for whatever reason some angry misogynist thought that was bad. It's the worst case scenario of gender-based violence, but it is far from the only scenario.

According to the Canadian Femicide Observatory for Justice and Accountability at the University of Guelph, a woman or girl is killed every two-and-a-half days in Canada, and these are not deaths by strangers. Nearly half, 47.7 per cent, are killed by a spouse or intimate partner, and another 30.5 per cent are killed by a parent or other family member.  Only 3.4 per cent of murdered women are killed by a stranger in the commission of a crime, which says that, statistically, women are in more danger at home than any other place.

You wonder what Guelph-Wellington Women in Crisis deal with on a daily business, and these numbers are a brief glimpse into that "day in the life of..." Like what happened at L'École Polytechnique three decades ago, the source of the struggle is the same: misogyny, inequality, control, possession, and hatred. Gender-based violence is real, and it's daily, but it doesn't have to be that way.

On this week's edition of the podcast, we're joined by Sly Castaldi and Jessica St. Peter, the executive director and public educator, respectively, of Guelph-Wellington Women in Crisis. With them, we'll talk about what they think about every 6th of December, how the discourse around gender-based violence has changed over the last three decades, and recent social movements like #MeToo. We also talk about the role of education in eliminating gender-based violence, and the role that men need to play reaching that goal including a segment where the host must answer the questions.

So let's talk about the issue of gender-based violence nearly 30 years after its worst case scenario on this week's edition of the Guelph Politicast!

If you would like to get involved as a donor or a volunteer with Guelph-Wellington Women in Crisis, you can find those links readily available at their website. There are two local commemorations for the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women this Friday, one at the Thornbrough Building at the University of Guelph campus at 3:30 pm, and the other at Gilbert MacIntyre & Son Funeral Home and Chapel at 1099 Gordon Street at 6 pm.

The host for the Guelph Politicast is Podbean. Find more episodes of the Politicast here, or download them on your favourite podcast app at iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify.

Also, when you subscribe to the Guelph Politicast channel and you will also get an episode of Open Sources Guelph every Monday, and an episode of End Credits every Friday.

Open Sources Guelph - November 28, 2019

2Dec

This week on Open Sources Guelph, we've got another show with back-to-back interviews that will help cue you up for the vote next week on the 2020 Guelph budget. First, we'll hear from Ward 2 Councillor Rodrigo Goller, who will be one of the 13 people making the final decision, and then we'll hear from Chief Gordon Cobey of the Guelph Police Service, who hopes council will approve his specific (and large) budget request.

This Thursday, November 28, at 5 pm, Scotty Hertz and Adam A. Donaldson will discuss:

Welcome Back, Goller. It was a tough week for Ward 2 Councillor Rodrigo Goller. He put forth a motion in good will to look at building harm reduction housing at 106 Beaumont Cres, but it started a firestorm that ate up three-and-a-half hours of debate at council to no avail. So what's next for Goller, and how has he enjoyed serving on council for one full year now? We'll ask the councillor those, and hopefully, many more questions.

Cobey's Beef. In a budget year that was already tough, the Guelph Police Service made it tougher with an ask for 9.8 per cent more over their 2019 budget to hire nearly two-dozen new officers and staff. The police board says it's a long overdue correction to properly cover a growing city, but "police problems" are so much bigger than law and order, so are more cops the answer? Guelph's new police chief Gordon Cobey will answer that and other questions.

Open Sources is live on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca at 5 pm on Thursday.

End Credits - November 27, 2019 (The Irishman)

29Nov

This week on End Credits, hold on your butts. No, seriously, because it's going to be numb by the end of the three-and-a-half hour running timing of this week's movie, The Irishman. We'll talk about that epic mob drama, and we'll wrap up the Best of the Decade series with a double dose! 

This Wednesday, November 27, at 2 pm, Adam A. Donaldson will discuss:

The Best of the Decade, Part 4 and 5 of 5. We’re coming up on the end of the year, but we’re also coming up on the end of the decade, so what else are we supposed to do but make a list of our favourite films of the last 10 years? This week Adam will run down his Top 10 of all the films released between January 1, 2010 and right this very moment!

REVIEW: The Irishman (2019). At once the most expensive project ever undertaken by both Netflix and Martin Scorsese, The Irishman is a magnum opus for Scorsese, and it seems to be a capstone for a career that's covered so many different mob stories. The gimmick this time is that we follow mob enforcer Frank Sheeran over five decades, all played by Robert DeNiro thanks to the wonders of de-aging technology. But is this everything Scorsese wanted it to be?

End Credits is on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca Wednesday at 2 pm.

GUELPH POLITICAST #198 - What’s in a Youth Wellness Hub?

27Nov

Early this month at Committee of the Whole, there was a presentation on the idea of a youth wellness hub, which has attracted the interest and participation of over 40 different groups in Guelph and Wellington County. Such a big project deserves a particularly thorough discussion, and that’s what this week's podcast is all about.

This week, we're joined by Kate Reed, the Project Manager for the Integrated Youth Services Network Initiative for Guelph-Wellington, and Carrie Chassels, the vice-provost of student affairs at the University of Guelph. They're two of the members of the steering committee for the project, which also includes representatives from the Canadian Mental Health Association Waterloo Wellington, the Waterloo Wellington LHIN, Guelph Wellington Dufferin Public Health, and Family & Children’s Services Guelph Wellington.

The idea of these Youth Wellness Hubs is the brainchild of Dr. Joanna Henderson from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH). It's a way of improving access to mental health and addiction services for Ontario’s youth and young adults, and then combing that with other needed services like housing and employment, or even just giving young people someplace to hang out after school. But how do we get one these youth hubs?

This week on the podcast, we’ll get all the details about the Guelph version of the Youth Wellness Hub project so far, and what the end result of the project will look like in practical terms. We also talk about the challenges, specifically how the Guelph Wellington Youth Hub will balance the needs of urban and rural youth, and whether or not the provincial funding will be there when the project is ready. And finally, we will look at how members of the community can get involved, what the political expectations are, and when we might finally see the local youth hub in business.

So let's talk about answering the needs of local youth on this week's edition of Guelph Politicast!

If you would like to get more information on the Integrated Youth Services Network Initiative, you can send an email to integratedyouthservicemodel [at] gmail.com. There will be a one-year update on the project this Friday at the Ariss Golf and Country Club featuring speakers from the Rotary Club of Guelph, CMHA Waterloo Wellington, Centre Wellington Big Brothers and Big Sisters, and the Guelph Community Foundation. Click here if you would like to learn more about the youth wellness hub model.

The host for the Guelph Politicast is Podbean. Find more episodes of the Politicast here, or download them on your favourite podcast app at iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify.

Also, when you subscribe to the Guelph Politicast channel and you will also get an episode of Open Sources Guelph every Monday, and an episode of End Credits every Friday.

Open Sources Guelph - November 21, 2019

25Nov

This week on Open Sources Guelph, we're packed with special guests, one from the local scene, and one from the national scene. In local news, we're going to talk about one of Guelph Ward 1 councillors who's been in the middle of a whirlwind lately. Then, in national news, just a day after Justin Trudeau announced his new cabinet, we'll talk to the newest member of another caucus who hopes to be a thorn in the side of those new members of cabinet.

This Thursday, November 21, at 5 pm, Scotty Hertz and Adam A. Donaldson will discuss:

Dan in Real Life. While this is the time of year where much of council's attention is taken up with the budget, Ward 1 Councillor Dan Gibson has had an entirely different issue fill his agenda over the last couple of weeks. Gibson will join us to talk about the concerns in his area about the process of developing harm reduction housing, the council motion to look at the site at 106 Beaumont, and how he hopes council might compromise on the issue at this Monday's meeting.

The Green Coast. The 2019 Federal Election had a lot of big hopes for the Green Party of Canada, but at the end of Election Night, only Fredericton's Jenica Atwin had won the chance to join the Green caucus in Ottawa. This week, we're joined by Atwin who will tell us about the growth of Green support across the east coast, how the party's going to change with the retirement of leader Elizabeth May, and what her goals and ambitions are as the new session of the House begins.

Open Sources is live on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca at 5 pm on Thursday.

End Credits - November 20, 2019 (Parasite)

22Nov

This week on End Credits, things are going to get dark. But Christmas is coming, you say! Pfft. Tell that to all these horror trailers, and upcoming scary movies, and also tell it to Bong Joon Ho. We're going to review the movie that won Cannes, and now the art house, and we're going to look at new trailers, a PG-13 rated horror, and Peter's Best of the Decade!

This Wednesday, November 20, at 2 pm, Adam A. Donaldson and Peter Salmon will discuss:

Black-ish Christmas. It was announced last week that the upcoming remake of Black Christmas will be rated PG-13. Many horror fans are concerned by that because such a rating implies less blood and guts that your typical slasher film that's rated R, but could the filmmakers be right that PG-13 is the right rating for this film, and do you need an R to be scary?

A Sonic Invisible Man on Fantasy Island. A couple of months ago, they released a trailer with a CG hedgehog that was so bad, they had to redo it and delay the film's release. Well, Sonic is back! Speaking of redos we'll also look at the new trailers for the Blumhouse remake of the 70s series Fantasy Island, and the classic monster movie The Invisible Man.

 

The Best of the Decade, Part 3 of 5. We’re coming up on the end of the year, but we’re also coming up on the end of the decade, so what else are we supposed to do but make a list of our favourite films of the last 10 years? This week Peter will run down his Top 5 of all the films released between January 1, 2010 and right this very moment!

REVIEW: Parasite (2019). Bong Joon Ho's Palme d'Or-winning film is on track to become one of the most successful foreign films at the North American box office, and it comes with a lot of hype and stratospheric critical acclaim. But what did *we* think of it? You're going to find out! Bong's film has comedy and thriller elements, plus an up-to-the-minute social message with its finger on the pulse. There's no possible way we could disagree on this movie, right...?

End Credits is on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca Wednesday at 2 pm.

GUELPH POLITICAST #197 - A Fair to November

20Nov

This past weekend, it was the 45th edition of Fair November, the annual craft show at the University of Guelph that takes over two floors of the University Centre with a wide variety of hats, jewelry, pottery, edibles, and other handmade goods. But who are these people, and how did they go about turning their passion into a small business?

Fair November is a big date on the local craft fair calendar, and an important yearly destination for people looking for one of a kind holiday gifts. Make no mistake, the craft business is booming! The Association for Creative Industries noted that there was a 45 per cent increase in revenue from the handcraft business between 2011 and 2017. That’s $30.1 billion, according to one source, which is about half of what the entire professional sports industry makes in the United States in a year.

Of course, Guelph's slice of the "craft-conomy" has it's own special flavour. People like the long hours, four day schedule, the easy to access location, no admission fees and lots of food and coffee nearby should people need a break, and then there’s the always helpful student volunteers who are there to marshal the visitors and assist the vendors as needed. It’s a veritable craft utopia, and on this episode we talk to the ones that live there.

So this week on the podcast, we'll hear from:

  • W. Bruce Smith of Paddles
  • Sarah Allison-Chorabik of Ontario Honey Creations
  • Karen Wilson of Karen WIlson Handbags
  • Stefan Marinov of Koka-Bora Creations
  • Wanda Lane of Stonescapes
  • Nancy Smith of Under the Divi
  • Errol Caldwall of Turning Point, and
  • Charlene Downey of Noggins

With these vendors, we discuss the fine points of their arts and crafts, how they turned their hobbies into thriving businesses, and what makes Fair November such an important destination for craft makers and craft enthusiasts alike.

So let's head to the floor of Fair November on this week's Guelph Politicast!

If you missed this year’s Fair November, you will be able to find it again on the second weekend of November in 2020. If you are an artisan, and you would like to take part in next year’s Fair, you can reserve your spot today by going to the Fair November website.

The host for the Guelph Politicast is Podbean. Find more episodes of the Politicast here, or download them on your favourite podcast app at iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify.

Also, when you subscribe to the Guelph Politicast channel and you will also get an episode of Open Sources Guelph every Monday, and an episode of End Credits every Friday.

Open Sources Guelph - November 14, 2019

18Nov

This week on Open Sources Guelph, we get to say goodbye to one of the greatest Canadians who hasn't been too great for a long time. Oh yes, we're going to have our say about the Don Cherry controversy, and we're going to dig back into the swamp for a little impeachment talk. At the bottom of the hour, we're going to get a little more serious and talk about one of the most disturbing, ongoing crimes of our times with someone who's lived it.

This Thursday, November 14, at 5 pm, Scotty Hertz and Adam A. Donaldson will discuss:

Cherry Bomb. Don Cherry is no stranger to stepping in it, but this time it cost him his long time gig on Hockey Night in Canada. His comments about "those people" enjoying "the land of milk and honey" while not acknowledging veterans by wearing a poppy was caught for all its subtext, although Cherry claims that he was not being a racist in talking about "those people." Did cancel culture get this one right?

Open House. After weeks of closed door hearings, the Democratic-lead impeachment committees are finally holding open meetings for all the world to see. The question: does hearing all the gory details of Donald Trump's attempted bribery of the Ukrainian government from the mouths of those that lived it going to persuade the die hard Trump base he's corrupt?

Prey. The stunning, systematic abuse by Catholic priests on young boys and girls is one of the most horrifying crimes, perhaps only eclipsed by the concentrated effort by the Church to cover it all up. This week, we'll be joined by Robert McCabe, a survivor who works with other survivors trying to recover from their abuse, and Matt Gallagher, the director of the new documentary Prey, which plays at the River Run Centre Saturday. They'll talk about the movie, and the push to hold the Church accountable.

Open Sources is live on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca at 5 pm on Thursday.

End Credits - November 13, 2019 (Last Christmas)

15Nov

This week on End Credits we get into a holiday mood. Our review is the perhaps too early release of Last Christmas, a rom-com based on a George Michael song about death and stuff. Speaking of death, it's no longer a barrier to casting, and at least one person is willing to call for an end to Disney. Plus, the best of the decade continues...

This Wednesday, November 13, at 2 pm, Adam A. Donaldson and Tim Phillips will discuss:

Dean Machine. It's been 60 years since James Dean was last in a movie. It's understandable why, he died in 1955, but the intrepid producers of Finding Jack are not letting death get in the way of hiring Dean to play the second lead. Is there a genuine artistic reason to resurrect James Dean, or are they violating Dean's memory for empty self-promotion?

A Game of Monopoly. On the eve the release of Disney+, author Matt Stoller makes a point in his new book, Goliath: The Hundred Year War Between Monopoly and Democracy, that Disney has become little more than a private equity firm squeezing every nickel out of partners, suppliers, and consumers. So can we have a conversation about breaking up Disney?

The Best of the Decade, Part 2 of 5. We're coming up on the end of the year, but we're also coming up on the end of the decade, so what else are we supposed to do but make a list of our favourite films of the last 10 years? This week Candice will run down her Top 5 of all the films released between January 1, 2010 and right this very moment!

REVIEW: Last Christmas (2019). 'Tis the season to be jolly, and nothing says "jolly" like a little yule tide romance. Emilia Clarke and Henry Golding make a love match in time for Christmas, but things, per usual, get complicated as Clarke's messy Kate gets a cosmic wake-up call from Golding's free spirit. It's a match made in heaven, so deck the halls for predictable rom-com tropes and a twist you'll see coming from a mile away.

End Credits is on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca Wednesday at 2 pm.

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