OPEN SOURCES GUELPH BEAT #8 - City Councillor Mark MacKinnon (Ward 6)

24Aug

Summer is winding down, and so are a lot of summer vacations, which means it will soon be time to get back to business as usual (or unusual as the case may be) at City Hall. Before that happens though, we look backwards one more time and the last city councillor to grace the CFRU studios for their 30 minutes of fame on Open Sources Guelph, Ward 6 Councillor Mark MacKinnon.

MacKinnon appeared on the July 14 edition of Open Sources, and is the fifth member of Guelph's city council to visit the show so far, but he is the first member of council we've had in who dabbles in board game publishing. That's one of many interesting factoids about MacKinnon, whose day job is in the more ordinary arena of real estate, but his part-time job as a city councillor makes MacKinnon a triple threat around the horseshoe.

Representing Guelph's "Deep South", MacKinnon is front and centre for a lot of difficult issues, perhaps none more so right now than the fate of the Niska Road bride, which remains a high contentious debate despite the fact that council voted to demolish it and build a two-lane bridge almost a year ago now. (We got a listener question about that one.) We also talked to MacKinnon about the things that never happened, like the service review he was pushing for last fall in the budget, and the ward boundary review that was also not supported in this year's budget. We also talked about non-Ward 6 issues like downtown redevelopment. 

So let's flashback to the July 14 edition of Open Sources Guelph and our guest Mark MacKinnon.

You can get in touch with Councillor MacKinnon through his office line at 519-822-1260 x 2296 or by email at mark.mackinnon@guelph.ca. You can also follow him on Twitter @Ward6Mark, and read his blog by clicking here.

You can download more podcasts off the Guelph Politicast channel on Podbean, including episodes of the Guelph Politicast, and full episodes of Open Sources Guelph.

For updates on special guests coming up on future episodes of Open Sources Guelph, you can visit the show's website here.

Of course, you can listen to every edition of Open Sources Guelph, live, Thursdays at 5 pm.

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Open Sources Guelph - August 18,2016

22Aug

So what’s in the news? It seems like it’s non-stop Trump zaniness, but this week on Open Sources Guelph, we ask a more important question: is this the end of civilization? One major magazine seems to think so, and we’ll break that down and figure out if we’ll remember one week in July as beginning of the end of society. After that we’ll talk about swimwear, cars, and power! But while that sounds like we’re doing some kind of manly man show, these are actually serious political issues that need to be discussed.

This Thursday, August 18, at 5 pm, Scotty Hertz and Adam A. Donaldson will discuss:

1) The End of the World As We Know It? A Slate article this week posed an interesting thought: What if, in the future, the week of July 11, 2016 is remembered as the week democracy died? A rare confluence of major events - the ascension of Teresa May to PM of the U.K., the attempted coup in Turkey, the terrorist attack in Nice, and the appointment of Mike Pence as Donald Trump’s running mate - all point to one inescapable conclusion: liberal democracy, as we know it, is on life support. Have things really gotten that bad though? Is there no way out but through as people more and more give in to the whims of demagogues who only know how to do two things: tell you what’s wrong with a country, and who’s to blame for it?

2) Burkini No Paradise. It may not be something you’re familiar with, and it may not be something you see at the beach in a million summer visits, but France is doing something about it, and that something is a full-blown ban. The “burkini”, a swimming garment for Muslim women that allows them to enjoy the water and keep their modesty, has gotten a lot of attention as several seaside French towns have banned it, and now with the support of French Prime Minister Manuel Valls. One can’t help but be reminded of the burka debate from last year’s election here in Canada, but France is still smarting from two major terrorist attacks in the space of six months, attacks perpetrated by Islamic extremists. So is this a stand for human rights, or is this a reaction to other concerns?

3) Tax it to the Wind! How can you put a tax on the wind? Interesting question, and not the slightest bit philosophical because Wyoming made it happen, and some are wondering, understandably, if the state government is trying to price out those that want to pursue alternative energy in the state. Wyoming’s biggest industry is mining, and mineral extraction, and that includes oil and gas obviously, so one can’t help but wonder if the Cowboy State (yes, that’s what it’s called, the “Cowboy State”) is stacking the deck, especially as most places are trying desperately to attract companies exploring alternative energy in order to create the “jobs of the future.” Can a government really tax the wind, and what’s the point?

4) Armoured and Dangerous. Earlier this year, the Federal Liberals got into some hot water for the sale of Canadian-made armoured vehicles to Saudi Arabia. That’s sticky enough, but what if a Canadian company sold armoured vehicles to countries like Libya and South Sudan? Well Streit, which has a plant in Innisfil, has been selling to those countries, and it’s reignited the contentious debate between the moral responsibility of not selling armaments to foreign countries that use them against their own citizens, breaking international law in some cases, and the need for well-paying Canadian jobs. What’s the responsible thing to do in this situation, and how are the Liberals going to paint themselves out of this corner?

Open Sources is live on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca at 5 pm on Thursday.

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GUELPH POLITICAST #47 - Stephen O’Brien, City Clerk

19Aug

The subtitle for this week's episode might well be "How does city council work?" Or at least, how does something transform from being an idea or suggestion into a new by-law or policy. Change is always inevitable, and there's a fairly significant change coming to the way council is conducted next month, the switch over from a standing committee model to a Committee-of-the-Whole one. So I thought, "Why not combine the ideas?"

On this week's Guelph Politicast, Stephen O'Brien, the city clerk of the City of Guelph, takes us though the process of how Committee-of-the-Whole went from something staff considered as a way to streamline how city council does business to becoming the actual way that city council will do business in just a few weeks. What are the steps between idea, committee, and council decision? What kind of research is involved? And when does a new idea get feedback and from who?

All good questions that O'Brien helped me figure out, and in addition that to insight into just how the sausage gets made (so to speak), this podcast will also let you know how Committee-of-the-Whole will be different, what changes you might expect when it's enacted, and how council and staff will determine if the whole of the Whole is working out for the best. If you love the minutiae of municipal politics, you will definitely want to grab a cup of tea and enjoy this in a place where you can lay back, relax and let yourself drift away to a beautiful space where policy and procedure is its own reward. (Hopefully, I didn't oversell that.)

Reminder: the first meeting of the Committee-of-the-Whole is on Tuesday September 6, and you can reach the clerk’s office at 519-837-5603 or clerks@guelph.ca. You can also follow the City of Guelph’s Twitter feed @cityofguelph to keep up to date with future meeting developments.

The theme music for the Guelph Politicast is from the KPM Klassics collection by Syd Dale.

The host for the Guelph Politicast is Podbean. Find more episodes of the Politicast here.

Remember that the Politicast Podbean channel is also the host for podcast versions of Open Sources Guelph. The previous Thursday's episode of Open Sources will be posted on Mondays.

Stay tuned for future editions of the Guelph Politicast!

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OPEN SOURCES GUELPH BEAT #7 - City Councillor James Gordon (Ward 2)

17Aug

Many city councillors manage two careers, but usually one of those careers takes them out of the spotlight. This is not the case with Ward 2 City Councillor James Gordon, who is a city councillor by day, and a singer/songwriter by night. Or maybe that's reversed. Or maybe they sometimes both take place at night. In any event, Gordon spends both career in the spotlight, and he recently took the hot seat on an episode of Open Sources Guelph a few weeks ago.

When Gordon appeared on the show back at the beginning of July there was an odd confluence of events as council headed into its last few weeks before summer break. There was the recent move to put on extra buses to deal with complaints about transit, there was the debate about a living wage at committee, and Gordon's personal push to make sure Guelph's original inhabitants are recognized at the beginning of every council meeting.

Along with the specific issues mentioned about, we also asked Gordon about making the transfer from activist to politician; it was a job he was trying to get for a while after all, with two previous runs at Queen's Park, and years forming groups like the Guelph Civic League and the Wellington Water Watchers. And obviously, we also talked about his latest musical foray, the self-titled Sunny Jim. 

So let's catch-up with Sunny Jim from the July 7 episode of Open Sources Guelph.

You can reach James Gordon at 519-822-1260 x 2504, or by email at james.gordon@guelph.ca. You can follow his blog, his Facebook page, or his Twitter feed. You can also buy his new album, Sunny Jimhere.

You can download more podcasts off the Guelph Politicast channel on Podbean, including episodes of the Guelph Politicast, and full episodes of Open Sources Guelph.

For updates on special guests coming up on future episodes of Open Sources Guelph, you can visit the show's website here.

Of course, you can listen to every edition of Open Sources Guelph, live, Thursdays at 5 pm.

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Open Sources Guelph - August 11,2016

15Aug

On this week’s episode of Open Sources Guelph we consider a name change to the show, at least through to November: “What Stupid Stuff Has Donald Trump Said This Week?” Obviously, that’s how we’ll kick off the show, but we’ll try and keep the insanity of “Cheeto Jesus” to a minimum as we look even further south to the Olympic games in Brazil, which aren’t nearly the disaster of the Trump campaign, but close. Then we’ll head out to Vancouver where one type of housing woe has replaced another, before wrapping things up with the delicate politics of Israel, and what one federal political party might have to say about them.

This Thursday, August 11, at 5 pm, Scotty Hertz and Adam A. Donaldson will discuss:

1) Sophomoric Slump. The cycle continues: Trump has a bad week, redeems himself by demonstrating skill at reading a teleprompter, and then he says something bat$#!% crazy to start the cycle all over again. This week, Trump told supporters that maybe Second Amendment supporters had a way to stop a future President Clinton from getting their guns. (Hint. Hint.) Following a beef with a Gold Star family, an asinine answer to a question about sexual harassment, and impetuously refusing to endorse high-profile members of his own party, Trump really didn’t need to say something stupid this week. Especially on a Tuesday. And Especially when Hillary Clinton keeps talking herself into trouble over emails. We’ll discuss the latest from the U.S. race.

2) Rio Static? Protests against the government, long lines to get into events, unfinished athletes’ quarters, and "dangerously high levels of sewage” in the bay where aquatics events are being held are just a few of the problems to be suffered through this first week of the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Heck, even the McDonalds in Athletes’ Village was forced to shutdown after being so overwhelmed, and this is McDonalds, a well-oiled machine if there ever was one. Whether the problems are real or imagined (a kayaker capsized by a submerged sofa?), this Olympiad may go down in history as one of the most logistically difficult in recent memory, which forces us to ask again: Is the Olympics really worth all this bother, scandal and outrage?

3) Tax Decentive. The people in the greater Vancouver area wanted the government to do something about ever increasing housing prices, so they did. A new tax on foreign buyers has had an immediate chilling effect on the red hot housing market on the left coast, and perhaps more than they intended as people in the midst of filing their papers now find themselves subjected to thousands of dollars more in a new tax, and it’s not just targeting those looking to purely invest their money in real estate that are affected. People looking to make their home in Vancouver, but don’t yet have their residency papers completed yet, have been classified as foreign buyers even though they’re planning on staying, forcing them to pay the extra tax as wekk. So has B.C.’s solution caused more problems than it’s solved?

4) It’s Not Easy Being Green. In a move that’s sure to be controversial - heck, it’s already controversial amongst the members - the Green Party has endorsed the addition of a caveat to support boycott, divestment and sanctions against Israel to the party platform at the Green convention last Sunday. Approval of the BDS was a grassroots effort that Elizabeth May and her shadow cabinet didn’t put their weight behind, and it happened just as Israel itself is considering ways to deport or bar the entry of activists advocating for a boycott of Israel. The measure is sure to pose a difficult question for the Greens as they look to the next election: are they sacrificing long-term electoral prospects for the short term bump from the party’s activist wing?

Open Sources is live on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca at 5 pm on Thursday.

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Open Sources Guelph - August 4,2016

15Aug

Oh man, how we long to go to the circus agin... Instead this week on Open Sources Guelph we resist the urge to talk about all those things zapping the oxygen south of the border, to tackle some serious issues. Terror has made the news again, but not because someone shot something up, or blew something up. Water is in the headlines, mostly the lack of it, but also the taking of it by big water bottling companies. Then we'll follow the tracks to Churchill, because the train don't run there anymore. And then we'll wrap up with trip overseas to Britain where they're still feeling the after effects from the Brexit. 

This Thursday, August 4, at 5 pm, Scotty Hertz and Adam A. Donaldson will discuss:

1) The Trouble with Terror. While a certain orange-coloured candidate down south is trying to get people worked up into a lather over terrorists hiding behind every rock, meanwhile NDP public safety critic Randall Garrison is getting ready to push a private members bill through the  House to repeal the law once known as Bill C-51, a piece of Conservative legislation that gave Canada's spy agencies sweeping new powers. At almost the same time last week, the conviction of John Nuttall and Amanda Korody were overturned on appeal with the presiding judge saying that the RCMP entrapped them, and provoked them into planning a Canada Day attack in Vancouver. So in this era of heightened concern about terrorism - especially after Nice, Orlando, San Bernadino, and Paris - is Canada now underreacting, or toning down the original overreaction?

2) A Bottling Plant Runs Through It. It's been a long dry summer for our region, with water use levels in Guelph having been on red alert for over a month now. It makes you wonder about the limits of our water resources, and whether it's a bright move on the part of the stewards of those resources to allow almost unilateral control over the most precious resource we have. Local advocates are pushing hard against Nestle in particular, as the company itself has admitted that their on the lookout for more wells to tap, all for the low, low price of about $5 a day for millions of litres of irreplaceable fresh water resources. Are we doing enough to protect our water, and why does the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change seem unresponsive to community concerns?

3) Back ‘Trax. A controversy in northern Manitoba this week has seen the shuttering of the Port of Churchill with the company OmniTrax unilaterally closing down Canada's only rail-accessible deepwater Arctic port leaving conditions in the local economy turbulent at best. Manitoba's new Premier, Brian Pallister, has said that OmniTrax is trying to get more money out of the provincial government, but the short term concern is that a lot of people in Churchill are out of work and thedifficulty in getting food and supplies to northern communities has increased. Is this a case of the limitations of corporate welfare, and what can/should Manitoba do now?

4) After Brexit? Way back on June 23, a slim majority of U.K. citizens voted to break away from the European Union, several political leaders quit their jobs after that, including Prime Minister David Cameron, and all was well in the land of Great Britain. Except not really. Dark economic clouds have been forming on the horizon, and the number of anti-immigrant hate crimes has increased. So now what? It's an excellent question that the North American press seems to have dropped since the immediate aftermath of the vote. So we'll check in with the post-Brexit world. What is the economic outlook for the U.K.? Is there a chance that Britain might come through this okay, and what are the odds it won't?

Open Sources is live on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca at 5 pm on Thursday.

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Open Sources Guelph - July 28, 2016

15Aug

After taking a week off, we have a lot of politics to catch up on with this week's Open Sources Guelph. First, we'll go to Philly where history was made as the first woman to win a major party nomination accepted with the trepidation of some in her party. It was serious stuff, the kind of stuff that make you want to take a trip to the circus. The Republicans threw one last week in honour of coronating their 2016 nominee, the orange-coloured ego man. Hopefully, this is something that will not be repeated next year when the Federal Conservatives and NDP choose a leader here in Canada. Speaking of circuses, the Canadian senate is hoping to go back to relative anonymity now that its members have all been cleared of criminal charges. It would be a crime to miss this week's episode. 

This Thursday, July 28, at 5 pm, Scotty Hertz and Adam A. Donaldson will discuss:

1) Fun in Philly. After the apocalyptic vision of modern America offered by Donald Trump and the parade of disgruntled GOP politicians and C-list celebrities called the Republican National Convention, it had to be smooth sailing for the Dems right? Not so fast... Even before Wikileaks info-dumped emails revealing that the DNC was in the tank for Hillary Clinton, and way before it was revealed that Russian hackers may have been behind it, discord was in the air. The so-called "Bernie Bros" weren't prepared to cede the race to Secretary Clinton even though things have lined up in her favour, and, you know, it was kind of the point of the convention. With all the talk about disunity amongst Republicans, is the real party of disharmony the Democrats?

2) The Carnival in Cleveland. The Republican National Convention featured a procedural meltdown, demands to send the Democratic nominee to prison, birtherism, plagiarism, racism, misogyny, and a moment that saw the presumptive nominee phone in an interview to Bill O’Reilly as coverage of the major speeches began at his own convention. And that was just the first night! The GOP meet up in Cleveland was just as fractious and demented as predicted, but in the end, everything seemed to come up Trump as the now anointed Republican Presidential nominee rallied everyone around the fire of America's ruin and promised that he, and only he, can cancel the apocalypse. With Trump and his running mate Gov. Mike Pence experiencing a post convention bump in the polls must we consider the possibility that - sigh - President Trump might be one stop closer to a reality?

3) Business as Usual. It seemed like only yesterday that the names Mike Duffy, Pamela Wallen and Patrick Brazeau were akin to 'mud' in the Red Chamber of Parliament Hill, but now free of any legal entanglements, it seems that bygones are bygones between all the members of the upper house. Just last week, Brazeau was back at work after being cleared of criminal charges relating to senate fraud, and Duffy re-hired two prominent staffers who were embroiled in the cover-up of his alleged misclaimed expenses, and told the senate we won’t be paying back that last $17,000. So all’s well that ends well, right? Hugh Segal even says the trio deserve an apology for their treatment. So what’s going to happen in the Senate now that everything is back to normal, no one had to accept any consequences, and nobody seemed to learn any lesson?

4) Oh No They Aren’t! Last week Tony Clement threw his hat in the ring to be the next leader of the Federal Conservatives, a road he’s hoed twice before without success. Still, Clement is probably the most high-profile and well-established name that has yet to nominate himself for the Conservative leadership race. Clement joins Michael Chong, Kellie Leitch, Deepak Obhrai and Maxime Bernier on the ballot, but what of the big names like Peter MacKay, Lisa Raitt, and, heaven forbid, Kevin O’Leary? Some are saying the all-stars are waiting out the inevitable electoral defeat to the Liberals in 2019 before committing, and if that’s true, will that be the excuse of some potential NDP leadership candidates? That race still has only one declared candidate. We’ll update both races.

Open Sources is live on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca at 5 pm on Thursday.

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GUELPH POLITICAST #46 - Nightlife Task Force

12Aug

It's coming! Or rather, They're coming! Back to School time will soon be upon us, and along with heading back to the books, the classes, the seminars, the study sessions, and the seemingly never-ending stream of projects, essays, and reports, the students of the University of Guelph will soon be coming back... to party! That may be an over-generalization, but it's also true that Downtown Guelph is going to get very busy again on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. This is where the Nightlife Task Force comes into play.

You may have heard the term in relation to articles posted at the beginning of the school year about the plans to manage the thousands of people who come Downtown on the weekends, but if you're like me, you might have wondered: Who are these people, when do they meet, and what is their reach in terms of the decisions they make and how they impact everyone in the core, from businesses to surrounding neighbourhoods?

So enter the Guelph Politicast. I reached out to the City of Guelph and asked to talk to members of the Task Force for this podcast. I was connected with Doug Godfry, Manager, By-law Compliance and Security for the City of Guelph, and Kathryn Hofer, Manager, Off-Campus Living at the University of Guelph. The City and the U of G represent two of the many stakeholders that take part in the Task Force, and they look at various considerations and make recommendations for By-law and Guelph Police Services to pursue when it comes to making the fall party scene fun for the revelers, and survivable for the residents.

So let's rock 'n; roll all night thanks to the sensible planning of the Nightlife Task Force on this week's Guelph Politicast.

If you have issues with anything that falls under the portfolio of the Nightlife Task Force, you can get in touch with  Doug Godfry at 519-837-2529, or  Kathryn Hofer at 519-824-4120 extension 56276. To learn more about the city’s noise or nuisance party policies, click here, and to learn more about Off-Campus Living at Student Life, click here.

The theme music for the Guelph Politicast is from the KPM Klassics collection by Syd Dale.

The host for the Guelph Politicast is Podbean. Find more episodes of the Politicast here.

Remember that the Politicast Podbean channel is also the host for podcast versions of Open Sources Guelph. The previous Thursday's episode of Open Sources will be posted on Mondays.

Stay tuned for future editions of the Guelph Politicast!

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OPEN SOURCES GUELPH BEAT #6 - Guelph Police Chief Jeff DeRuyter

10Aug

What began as an experiment to get the city's politicians on the show, has expanded into other areas. Like policing. In an effort to expose out listeners to the myriad of voices that make a difference to our lives in Guelph everyday, back in June we invited the police chief onto Open Sources Guelph, which might have marked the first time the police was intentionally invited into CFRU.

On the June 30 show, we were joined by Chief Jeff DeRuyter of the Guelph Police Service. Chief DeRuyter has made a career of policing in Guelph, starting as a beat cop in 1984 and working his way up the leadership of the service until he became chief in March 2015.

With a career of long-standing service in Guelph, Chief DeRuyter knows his town, even if it sometimes seems like Mayberry thanks to one of the lowest crime rates in Canada. Still, by Guelph comparisons it's been city under siege time with cold-blooded murder and acts of shocking violence having occurred over the last year, from a northend hotel to the General Hospital. These are rather shocking crimes for our fairly laid back little town, and we got DeRuyter's opinion on whether the perception of Guelph is safe is fracturing. 

We also talked to the Chief about drug abuse downtown, repeated theft from unlocked cars, and speeding issues, along with sunnier matters like the Special Olympics, which were held earlier this year and were hosted by the Guelph Police Service, as well as the serious renovations being done at Police headquarters. 

So let's catch up with the Chief, and flashback to Jeff DeRuyter's appearance on Open Sources Guelph on June 30.

You can download more podcasts off the Guelph Politicast channel on Podbean, including episodes of the Guelph Politicast, and full episodes of Open Sources Guelph.

For updates on special guests coming up on future episodes of Open Sources Guelph, you can visit the show's website here.

Of course, you can listen to every edition of Open Sources Guelph, live, Thursdays at 5 pm.

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GUELPH POLITICAST #45 - Wellington Water Watchers

5Aug

It was a month ago today, that the City of Guelph took the water use level down to Level 2 Red. Indeed emphasis of water use during the Summer of 2016 is "less is more," as an unusually dry winter has lead into an unusually dry spring and summer. Given the preciousness of water, and the unusual scarcity of it this year, would it not be advisable to think about just how we spend those resources?

That's always been the message of Wellington Water Watchers, and in the midst of a long dry summer their issues are coming into even more stark relief. On top of that, local environmentalists are really feeling the pinch because we seem to be surrounded by Nestle planting its flag in various wells around our region, first in Aberfoyle, then in Hillsburgh, and now in Elora and Middlebook. On top of that, the always contentious water-taking contract for Nestle at Aberfoyle expired this past Sunday, but as of today they're still filling those bottles. So what's going on?

Given all that, I reached out to Wellington Water Watchers for some potential explanations. Arlene Slocombe and Robert Case are both members of the Watchers, who, while getting some traction in fighting back against Nestle in Hillsburgh, are still trying to get bottled water-fillers out of Aberfoyle after almost a decade. Founded in 2007, the mission of Wellington Water Watchers is being "committed to the protection of local water and to educating the public about threats to the watershed." If anything, their job has gotten harder in the last nine years, not easier.

So in the midst of a hot, dry summer, and the looming spectre that Nestle may be getting another lucrative 10-year deal to take millions more litres of water from the local aquafer, I got together with the two local water conservation activists to talk about that elixir of life, which is both fragile and plentiful, at least for people in this area, and why it seems like we're taking it all for granted.

So let's head down to the river, or rather at a conveniently situated coffee shop nearby, to talk about Water with the Wellington Watchers.

Addendum: Lindsay Davidson of the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change offered me a comment about the status of Nestle's contract, and how they can still be pulling water from the well when their deal has expired:

Nestlé submitted an application to renew its existing permit for the Aberfoyle well. We are currently reviewing the application and supporting documentation.

Under the Ontario Water Resources Act, if an application for renewal of an existing permit is made at least 90 days before its expiry, the permit remains in force until the ministry makes a decision on the permit renewal application. 

The ministry evaluates each proposed water permit application to determine if it meets the principles of the Permit to Take Water program including, protecting the natural functions of the ecosystem, preventing unacceptable interference with other water users, and fair sharing and conservation of water. 

This application will be posted on the Environmental Registry for public review. All comments received during the comment period will be considered before a decision is made.

To learn more about water issues in Guelph and area, you can go to the website for Wellington Water Watchers, or interact with them through social media on Facebook and Twitter. You can also go to the website, SaveOurWater.ca.

The theme music for the Guelph Politicast is from the KPM Klassics collection by Syd Dale.

The host for the Guelph Politicast is Podbean. Find more episodes of the Politicast here.

Remember that the Politicast Podbean channel is also the host for podcast versions of Open Sources Guelph. The previous Thursday's episode of Open Sources will be posted on Mondays.

Stay tuned for future editions of the Guelph Politicast!

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